St. Mary Magdalene Episcopal Church

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Welcome to the St. Mary Magdalene Episcopal Parish website.  I hope that you find our updated website both informative and easy to navigate.
 
St. Mary Magdalene Episcopal Parish is a welcoming Christian community which celebrates, embraces and shares the Good News of Jesus Christ with a world hungry for the Word of God in their daily lives.


The Reverend Canon Mark H. Sims
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Digital Advent & More...

Following the Star… www.d365.org Daily online devotions take on a seasonal theme beginning with first Sunday in Advent on November 30. Following the Star is written for teenage youth and the adults who work with them. Subscribe to the website to receive a daily reminder or download the mobile app; d365 Daily Devotions by Passport, Inc. This service is a collaborative initiative of the Youth Ministries offices of The Episcopal Church, Presbyterian Church USA, and Cooperative Baptist Fellowship.

Society of Saint John the Evangelist has developed a digital Advent calendar. Subscribe at ssje.org/adventword and receive a daily word and meditation accompanied by a stunning image delivered to your inbox. The Brothers also invite people to pray with their phone cameras and submit photos.

Church Publishing of the Episcopal Church has released an app entitled Living Well Through Advent 2014 that provides scripture and a place for writing reflections.

A Letter from Bishop Frade:

As most of you know by now, Canon Mark Sims, Rector of St. Mary Magdalene Episcopal Church, and Board Chair of Episcopal Charities of Southeast Florida, was issued a criminal citation for feeding the homeless on the streets of Ft. Lauderdale on All Saints’ Sunday, November 2nd. Canon Sims is facing a $500 fine and the possibility of sixty days in jail for sharing food with the homeless.

In spite of the possibility of facing another criminal citation Canon Sims is determined to continue feeding individuals living on our city streets. Additionally, he and many others throughout the Diocese continue to serve meals through the many programs operating in parishes, food banks, shelters and established food sharing programs.

 

Canon Sims, along with his parishioners and several friends have raised $20,000 over the past two days with the goal of using these funds to issue a challenge grant to the parishes in the Diocese with the hope of doubling the funds they have raised. The money raised will be matched, dollar for dollar, with any and all funds raised up to $20,000.

 

When I spoke with Mark last week he recounted how so many members who had attended the Diocesan convention, both lay and clergy, asked him, “What can I do to help?” Well, my brothers and sisters, now is the opportunity to show your support of our Diocese’s efforts to feed and care for the most needy who live amongst us, and to show your support toward his efforts to answer Christ’s call of us to care for the poor.

 

As your Bishop, I am asking all of you, over the next two weeks to take at least one collection at your parish that will be used for the sole purpose of putting food into the hands and mouths of the most needy people. Your contributions will be matched by the funds Mark has already raised, up to $20,000.

 

As we all share the Gospel message from Matthew 25 this weekend, let this be an opportunity to put words into action in our parishes and within the Diocese. I pray that you will use this simple act of sacrifice and compassion to bring hope to the individuals and families who might otherwise go hungry.

 

Please consolidate your individual parish’s collection, and forward your check to Episcopal Charities who will coordinate the collection.

 

Blessings,

+The Right Reverend Leopold Frade

Are you ready to do something

to feed the hungry and homeless?

 

Stay informed…

like & follow Fr. Mark’s Facebook page: www.facebook.com/mark.sims.96387?fref=ufi

(or search Mark Sims, Miami Shores)

like & follow the story on the church Facebook page: www.facebook.com/St.MandM

as well as Youtube: http://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLfxkdfwDQAurAhdKyI5GID3IxH-jacAKQ

 

Volunteer…

at St. Laurence Chapel, see Deacon Lorna deaconlorna@stmandm.org

with the Social Action Committee,

Philippa Sunnergren philsunnergren@hotmail.com

 

Contribute…

Fr. Mark Sims Homeless Defense Fund: gofund.me/gqf8ws

Episcopal Charities of Southeast Florida: www.ecsefl.org

Service Schedule

Weekend Service Schedule

Saturday at 5 p.m., Holy Eucharist

Sunday at 8:00 a.m., Holy Eucharist Rite I

Sunday at 10:30 a.m., Holy Eucharist Rite II

Weekday Service Schedule

Wednesday at 7:30 a.m., Healing Service and Holy Communion

Contact us here.


Readings for Christmas Eve

Isaiah 62:1-12

Titus 3:4-7

Psalm 96

Luke 2:1-20

readings forChristmas Day

Isaiah 52:7-10

Hebrews 1:1-12

Psalm 98

John 1:1-14

The First Sunday after Christmas

Genesis 3:1-15

Isaiah 7:10-15

Luke 2:1-20

Matthew 2:13-18

John 1:1-18

Isaiah 35:1-10

Luke 1:5-25

Luke 2:21-36

Galatians 3:23-25, 4:4-7

Holy Days and Holidays

Sun. · Dec. 21

St. Thomas (Apostle)—In the gospels Thomas appears primarily in John, including the famous scene following the resurrection in which Thomas is reluctant to believe Jesus had been raised. This gave rise to the phrase “doubting Thomas.” The story appears each year on the Second Sunday of Easter, which is thereby often known as “Thomas Sunday.” Actually, Thomas gets a bad rap. He did not doubt as much as seek evidence any rational person would look for. Ancient tradition says he carried the gospel east to Iran and even India. A prominent gnostic apocryphal Gospel of Thomas is attributed to him. [This year his feast day is transferred to Monday.]

Mon. · Dec. 22

Henry Budd (Priest, 1875)—Budd was the first person of First Nations ancestry to be ordained in the Anglican tradition in North America. He served primarily as a teacher and priest among his own people, the Cree in Western Canada, for whom he translated the Bible and Prayer Book.

Charlotte Diggs Moon (Missionary in China, 1912)—Lottie Moon was raised in a Southern Baptist family in Virginia. She had a gift for languages and was one of the first women in the South to earn a graduate degree. She was sent to do mission work in northern China where she learned to love and respect the Chinese culture. She died on Christmas Eve, and Baptist churches continue to collect money for foreign missions at Christmas in her memory.

Tue. · Dec. 23

Rabbi Abraham Heschel (Teacher and prophet, 1972)—A major force in Jewish spiritual renewal, Heschel came from a long line of Hasidic rabbis. After studying philosophy at Warsaw and Berlin he taught at several universities, eventually escaping to the United States from Nazi Germany. As a champion of interfaith dialogue, his writings exerted a tremendous influence on Christian thought. With a deep sense of prophetic justice, he sought to connect the mysticism of his Hasidic faith with the modern secular world.

Wed. · Dec. 24

Christmas Eve—In both Jewish and Muslim tradition, and in the Bible, the beginning of the day occurs the preceding evening at sunset. Thus, many festivals of the Christian Year are marked with a vigil, or “eve”, liturgy. The best known of these, apart from the tradition of a midnight mass the night before Christmas, is the Great Vigil of Easter on Saturday night of Holy Week. Our Saturday services at 5:00 pm are a vigil mass.

Thur. · Dec. 25

The Nativity of our Lord Jesus Christ—From the gospels we learn that our Savior was born in poverty and fled as a child refugee, and as an adult, like the homeless and hungry today, he relied on the generosity of others to have a place to sleep and food to eat. The celebration of Christmas at the darkest days of Winter marks the birth of light and hope for the world. It was in Rome in 336 that December 25 was set for the date of his birth, replacing an existing Roman holiday, the birth of the Unconquerable Sun. The actual date Jesus was born was more likely in the Spring. The word Christmas can be traced to the 12th century as a contraction of Christ’s Mass. While many take exception to the modern abbreviation of Xmas, the X is actually an ancient Christian abbreviation of Christ found in early copies of the New Testament, which substitutes the work Christ with the Greek letter chi, or X.

Fri. · Dec. 26

St. Stephen (Deacon and Martyr)—Most likely a Hellenistic Jew, Stephen is remembered as one of the first deacons chosen in the early Christian community in Jerusalem to aid the Apostles by caring for the sick and needy. Accused of blasphemy for his new faith, he was brought before the Sanhedrin, the Jewish ruling Council. Without a trial they dragged him outside the city gate and stoned him to death. Thus he became the first Christian martyr. His execution was supervised by Saul, who was later himself converted and became the Apostle Paul. Stephen’s story is told in Acts 6-7. His witness reminds us that being a disciple of Christ can demand that we meet the same fate as our Master.

Boxing Day (Secular holiday)—In the United Kingdom, Canada, Jamaica, and other Commonwealth nations Boxing Day is a bank holiday. Traditionally it was a time when servants and tradespeople would receive gifts, known as a “Christmas box,” from their employers.

Kwanzaa (African-American observance)—This modern African-American celebration of family and culture was founded in 1966, and runs through January 1. Red, green, and black candles (similar to what is featured on the cover of the Lift Every Voice and Sing hymnal) are lit representing seven virtues of life: unity, self-determination, collective work and responsibility, cooperative economics, purpose, creativity, and faith. The name of the holiday comes from a Swahili phrase matunda ya kwanza, meaning “first fruits of the harvest.”

Sat. · Dec. 27

St. John (Apostle and Evangelist)—Called from life as a fisherman to follow Jesus, John became, with Peter and James, one of the inner circle of Jesus’ followers. He was impetuous and ambitious, and is remembered traditionally as the writer of the Gospel of John and book of Revelation. Ancient icons picture him as the “Beloved Disciple” at the Last Supper with his head on Jesus’ breast. Tradition holds that he took care of Mary after Jesus’ death on the cross, and that he later settled at Ephesus in modern Turkey. Exiled by Emperor Domitian to the island of Patmos (where he had his visions), he is the only one of the twelve to live to an old age and escape a martyr’s death. His symbol is an eagle. It is John who reminds us over and over of Jesus’ command for us to love one another.

St.Mary Magdalene Episcopal Church Oasis in Advent

St. Mary Magdalene will offer our own Advent reflections online with links on the parish website and Twitter page. Find a refreshing place to go in the midst of daily pre-Christmas chaos and see how your fellow parishioners are engaging the season....

<p><strong>December 19, 2014</strong></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span>Advent is a season when we naturally think about Mary, the Mother of our Lord. With her we await the birth of the Christ Child. I would like to invite you to share in an Advent devotion from a small book called <em>Holding Your Prayers in Your Hands: Praying the Anglican Rosary</em>. If you have a rosary, take it out. If it is a little different from the Anglican style, that’s okay. If you don’t have one, just hold on to a cross or other object that gives you a sense of peaceful calm. It is very simple…</span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><em><span>Holding the cross, pray:</span></em><span><br/> Hail Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee. Blessed art thou amongst women, and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus. Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now, and at the hour of our death. Amen.</span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><em><span>Moving to the first large bead, pray:<br/></span></em><span>For God alone my soul in silence waits; from him comes my salvation.</span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><em><span>At the next large bead, pray:<br/></span></em><span>O come, O come, Emmanuel.</span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><em><span>For the small beads, pray these in order:<br/></span></em><span>Lord, as I await your coming, prepare my heart to receive you.<br/> Lord, as I await your coming, grant me simplicity of spirit.<br/> Lord, as I await your coming, grant me the grace to see you in all people.<br/> Lord, as I await your coming, grant me the courage to do what is difficult.<br/> Lord, as I await your coming, strengthen me in your service.<br/> Lord, as I await your coming, protect me from temptation.<br/> Lord, as I await your coming, grant me peace.</span></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><em><span>Repeat the above two prayers at each large bead and group of small ones; four times in over. At the very end, say a final Amen.</span></em></p>
<p class="MsoNormal"><span>May God the Holy Spirit, by whose working Mary conceived the Christ, help us bear the fruits of joy and peace. Amen.</span></p>

<p class="MsoNormal"><span>—David Park, <em>Director of Music</em></span><span></span></p>

December 19, 2014

Advent is a season when we naturally think about Mary, the Mother of our Lord. With her we await the birth of the Christ Child. I would like to invite you to share in an Advent devotion from a small book called Holding Your Prayers in Your Hands: Praying the Anglican Rosary. If you have a rosary, take it out. If it is a little different from the Anglican style, that’s okay. If you don’t have one, just hold on to a cross or other object that gives you a sense of peaceful calm. It is very simple…

Holding the cross, pray:
Hail Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee. Blessed art thou amongst women, and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus. Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now, and at the hour of our death. Amen.

Moving to the first large bead, pray:
For God alone my soul in silence waits; from him comes my salvation.

At the next large bead, pray:
O come, O come, Emmanuel.

For the small beads, pray these in order:
Lord, as I await your coming, prepare my heart to receive you.
Lord, as I await your coming, grant me simplicity of spirit.
Lord, as I await your coming, grant me the grace to see you in all people.
Lord, as I await your coming, grant me the courage to do what is difficult.
Lord, as I await your coming, strengthen me in your service.
Lord, as I await your coming, protect me from temptation.
Lord, as I await your coming, grant me peace.

Repeat the above two prayers at each large bead and group of small ones; four times in over. At the very end, say a final Amen.

May God the Holy Spirit, by whose working Mary conceived the Christ, help us bear the fruits of joy and peace. Amen.

—David Park, Director of Music

December 19th 2014

Tidings

I bring you good tidings of great joy. A parish family is proud to announce!

 

Blessed are you, Lord God. May these expectant parents’ experience of birth be full of awe and wonder and the joy of sharing in your creation. Amen.

Blessed are you, Lord God. May every person’s expectation of the birth of Jesus be ever fresh and new, full of awe and wonder, this Christmas and Christmases to come. Amen.

December 18th 2014

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Parish Announcements

 

  • Children’s Christmas Pageant final rehearsal read more>>

Cycle of Prayer

This week, please pray for the following—

Diocese of Southeast Florida, especially...

The Rt. Rev. Leo Frade, our bishop

St. Martin’s, Pompano Beach

St. Paul et Les martyrs d’Haiti, Miami

Iglesia Episcopal Trinidad, Miami

 

Anglican Communion, especially…

The Most Rev. Justin Welby, Archbishop of
   Canterbury

Anglican Diocese Kontagora (Lokoja, Nigeria)

Christ the King, Nassau

 

Ministries in this parish…

Coffee Hour volunteers

David Graff, 5:00 service guitarist

 

Ministries in the world…

South FL Haiti Project

scientists and researchers who expand our understanding of the world

 

Intercessions for…
all who work to save the earth from destruction

the selection of a new Bishop for our diocese

 

Thanksgiving for…

the treasure stored in every human life

those celebrating birthdays and anniversaries

the saints and holy days remembered this week

Recommended Books 

Prayer for Opening Gifts or Christmas Eve

Glory to you, Giver of all good gifts!
We offer you glad thanks and praise
for every blessing from your love,
and especially for the best gift of yourself
in the child Jesus. Amen.

                 —Jennifer M. Phillips, an Episcopal priest,    
       is Rector of St. Francis Church, Rio Rancho, NM



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